Responsive navigation bar - Bedimcode

Tenses

Mixed Tenses

Test Your Tense Knowledge with Our Fun and Engaging Tense Quiz.

4.7/5

What is Present Perfect Tense? | Examples, Tip & Trick & PDF

Introduction

The present perfect tense is a verb tense used to describe an action or event that occurred at an indefinite time in the past and is still relevant or has an effect on the present. It is formed with the present tense of the auxiliary verb “to have” followed by the past participle of the main verb.

Explanation of Present Perfect Tense

To form the present perfect tense, you need to use the auxiliary verb “to have” in the present tense, followed by the past participle of the main verb. For example:
“I have eaten breakfast.”
“They have finished their homework.”
“She has gone to the store.”

Table of Present Perfect Tense

Subject Have/Has Past Participle Example
I
have
walked
I have walked to the park.
You
have
danced
You have danced beautifully.
He/She/It
has
eaten
She has eaten her lunch already.
We
have
played
We have played this game before.

Usage of Present Perfect Tense

To describe an action or event that started in the past and continues up to the present. For example:

“I have been studying English for two years.”
“He has lived in New York for ten years.”

To describe an action or event that happened at an indefinite time in the past and is still relevant to the present. For example:

“She has lost her keys.”
“They have finished their project.”

To describe an action or event that happened recently and has an effect on the present. For example:

“I have just finished my work.”
“He has already eaten lunch.”

To talk about an experience that has happened in someone’s life. For example:

“I have visited Europe three times.”
“She has never ridden a horse.”

Example in Simple Sentences

“I have watched that movie before.”
“He has read that book.”
“She has finished her work.”

Example in Complicated Sentences

“After she has finished her work, she will go for a walk.”
“I have been waiting for two hours, and the bus still has not arrived.”
“They have been married for twenty years, and they still love each other.”

Tips and Tricks for Using Present Perfect Tense

Remember to use the present tense of the auxiliary verb “to have” and the past participle of the main verb.
Use the present perfect tense to describe an action or event that happened at an indefinite time in the past and is still relevant to the present.
Use the present perfect tense to describe an action or event that started in the past and continues up to the present.
Use the present perfect tense to talk about experiences that have happened in someone’s life.

Using Present Perfect Tense in Writing

When writing in the present perfect tense, it is important to use it appropriately to convey the intended meaning. Using the present perfect tense can add depth and nuance to your writing by emphasizing the ongoing nature of an action or event. It is also useful when discussing experiences that have happened in the past and are still relevant to the present.
When using the present perfect tense in writing, consider the context and purpose of your writing. For example, if you are writing a narrative, using the present perfect tense can create a sense of immediacy and bring the reader into the action. However, if you are writing an academic paper, using the present perfect tense can help you discuss research that has been conducted and is still relevant to the present.

Using Present Perfect Tense in Speech

Using the present perfect tense in speech is also important for effective communication in English. When speaking, using the present perfect tense can help you emphasize the ongoing nature of an action or event and connect it to the present. It is also useful when discussing experiences that have happened in the past and are still relevant to the present.
When using the present perfect tense in speech, consider the context and audience. For example, using the present perfect tense can be more formal and appropriate in a business meeting, whereas using the past simple tense may be more appropriate in a casual conversation.

Common Mistakes to Avoid

Using the present perfect tense to describe an action or event that happened at a specific time in the past. For example, “I have watched that movie yesterday” is incorrect. Instead, use the past simple tense: “I watched that movie yesterday.”
Using the present perfect tense when the action or event is no longer relevant to the present. For example, “I have eaten breakfast three hours ago” is incorrect. Instead, use the past simple tense: “I ate breakfast three hours ago.”
Forgetting to use the past participle of the main verb. For example, “I have went to the store” is incorrect. Instead, use the past participle of the main verb: “I have gone to the store.”
Using the wrong auxiliary verb. For example, “She has ate breakfast” is incorrect. Instead, use the present tense of the auxiliary verb “to have”: “She has eaten breakfast.”
Forgetting to use “not” to make the negative form of the present perfect tense. For example, “I have not ate breakfast yet” is incorrect. Instead, use “not” after the present tense of the auxiliary verb “to have”: “I have not eaten breakfast yet.”

Correct: I have finished my homework.
Explanation: The sentence uses the present perfect tense correctly to show that the speaker has completed an action in the past that has relevance to the present.

Incorrect: I have ate breakfast.
Explanation: The sentence is incorrect because the past participle of the verb “eat” is “eaten,” and not “ate.” The correct sentence would be “I have eaten breakfast.”

Short Sentence Examples of Present Perfect Tense

I have lost my marbles.
I have seen better days.
I have fallen head over heels in love.
I have slept like a baby.
I have eaten enough to feed a small army.

FAQs About Present Perfect Tense

Yes, it is possible to use the present perfect tense with adverbs of time such as “already,” “just,” and “yet.” For example, “I have already finished my homework.”
No, the present perfect tense is used to talk about actions that happened at an unspecified time in the past or actions that started in the past and continue up to the present. The past simple tense is used to talk about actions that happened at a specific time in the past.
“Have” is used with “I,” “you,” “we,” and “they,” while “has” is used with “he,” “she,” and “it.”

To Practice and Improve Your Skills, Download Free PDF. It Contains Questions and Answers to Enhance Your Learning.

Shopping Basket