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Conjunctions

Mixed Conjunctions

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What are Subordinating Conjunctions? | Examples, Tip & Trick & PDF

Introduction:

In the English language, conjunctions are important parts of speech that connect words, phrases, or clauses. There are three types of conjunctions: coordinating, subordinating, and correlative. In this article, we will focus on subordinating conjunctions and their importance in constructing meaningful sentences.

Explanation of Subordinating Conjunctions

Subordinating conjunctions are words that join dependent clauses to independent clauses, creating a complex sentence. They function to show the relationship between the dependent clause and the main clause. Some examples of subordinating conjunctions are after, although, as, because, before, if, since, unless, until, when, and while.

Table of Subordinating Conjunctions

Subordinating Conjunctions Example
after
After he finished his homework, he went to bed.
although
Although it was raining, we decided to go for a walk.
as
As I was leaving, she arrived.
as if/ as though
She acted as if she didn't care.

Usage of Subordinating Conjunction

Subordinating conjunctions are used to join dependent clauses to independent clauses. The dependent clause cannot stand alone as a sentence, and it requires the independent clause to form a complete sentence. For example, “Although it was raining, we decided to go for a walk.” In this sentence, the dependent clause “although it was raining” is joined to the independent clause “we decided to go for a walk” by the subordinating conjunction “although.”

Example in Simple Sentences

I will be happy if I pass my exam.
After I finish work, I will go to the gym.
Because it’s snowing, we can’t go for a picnic.

Example in Complicated Sentences

Although I had studied hard for the exam, I still felt nervous when I entered the exam hall.

In this sentence, “although” is the subordinating conjunction that joins the dependent clause “Although I had studied hard for the exam” to the independent clause “I still felt nervous when I entered the exam hall.”

Tips and Tricks for Using Subordinating Conjunction

Identify the main clause and the dependent clause in the sentence.
Place the subordinating conjunction at the beginning of the dependent clause.
Use a comma to separate the dependent and independent clauses when the dependent clause comes before the independent clause.

Using Subordinating Conjunctions in Writing

Using subordinating conjunctions in writing can help you create more complex and interesting sentences. They allow you to convey ideas in a clear and concise manner. However, it is important to use them correctly and not overuse them, as this can make your writing difficult to understand.

Using Subordinating Conjunctiounctions in Speech

Using subordinating conjunctions in speech can also help you convey ideas in a clear and concise manner. They can help you connect ideas and convey relationships between clauses. However, it is important to use them appropriately and not overuse them, as this can make your speech sound unnatural.

Common Mistakes to Avoid

Confusing subordinating conjunctions with coordinating conjunctions. Subordinating conjunctions join dependent clauses to independent clauses, while coordinating conjunctions join independent clauses.
Forgetting to use a comma when the dependent clause comes before the independent clause.
Overusing subordinating conjunctions, which can make your writing or speech difficult to understand.

Correct: After I finish my work, I will go to the gym.
Explanation: In this sentence, “after” is the subordinating conjunction that joins the dependent clause “after I finish my work” to the independent clause “I will go to the gym.” The sentence is correct because the subordinating conjunction is placed at the beginning of the dependent clause, and a comma is used to separate the dependent and independent clauses.

Incorrect: I will eat dinner although I am not hungry.
Explanation: This sentence is incorrect because the subordinating conjunction “although” is used incorrectly. “Although” is used to show a contrast between two ideas, but in this sentence, there is no contrasting idea presented. A better way to write this sentence would be “I am not hungry, but I will eat dinner.”

Short Sentence Examples of Subordinating Conjunctions

While the cat’s away, the mice will play.
If at first, you don’t succeed, try, try again.
Because I said so, that’s why!

(FAQs) About Subordinating Conjunctions

It depends on the position of the dependent clause in the sentence. If the dependent clause comes before the independent clause, a comma should be used to separate the two clauses. If the dependent clause comes after the independent clause, no comma is needed.
The choice of subordinating conjunction depends on the relationship between the dependent and independent clauses. For example, “if” is used to show a condition, while “because” is used to show a reason.
TNo, subordinating conjunctions can only be used to join a dependent clause to an independent clause.
The function of a subordinating conjunction is to join a dependent clause to an independent clause, creating a complex sentence.

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